Cynthia Nixon’s wife knew her And Just Like That love scene was ‘going to be hot’

She got hot and heavy in the kitchen with co-star Sara Ramirez in And Just Like That.

And Cynthia Nixon’s wife Christine Marinoni knew that moment was ‘going to be hot’ and ‘real’ with a ‘queer’ writer devising the scene.

‘[Episode writer] Samantha Irby was telling us all about that scene before we ever got to read it,’ Cynthia, 56, told Bowen Yang as part of a conversation for Variety. ‘Having a queer woman in the writers’ room writing this queer sex scene, my wife was like, “I know it’s going to be hot, and I know it’s going to be real.”

‘I know it’s going to be real’: Cynthia Nixon’s wife Christine Marinoni knew that moment was ‘going to be hot’ and ‘real’ with a ‘queer’ writer devising the scene; pictured 2014

‘We had an intimacy coordinator and we tried to do it different ways. Miranda, in the next episode, keeps having fantasies. And so we were going to shoot it at the same time, but make it look different, because things look different when we remember them than when they’re actually happening.”

Bowen said of the love scene, ‘What I think is remarkable is that you had to sell that moment in the kitchen as life-changing. You have to believe that she’s going to rearrange everything about her life.’

Cynthia said, ‘And you have to feel both the sexual jolt and also the emotional breakdown that happens later, not just that this thing that happens is earth-shattering, but also that she’s been in winter for so long. It’s both of those things.’

In And Just Like That, Miranda says her husband Steve and begins dating non-binary comedian Che Diaz (Sara).

Hot and heavy!  Nixon and co-star Sara Ramirez had a sexy love scene in the kitchen in And Just Like That

Hot and heavy! Nixon and co-star Sara Ramirez had a sexy love scene in the kitchen in And Just Like That

Earlier this month, Cynthia revealed she thought Miranda had been coded as ‘queer’ even going back to the original Sex And The City series, which ran on HBO from 1998 to 2004.

Although the star acknowledged the series didn’t have much representation for gay women, she said in an interview with Variety for their Pride issue that Miranda was a ‘stand-in’ for them thanks to what she saw as ‘lesbianic qualities.’

Cynthia suggested there were hints that Miranda was queer back in the first series.

Old news: Nixon, 56, shared with Variety in an interview published earlier this month that she though her Sex And The City character Miranda had always been queer, even before she came out on And Just Like That;  seen May 24 in NYC

Old news: Nixon, 56, shared with Variety in an interview published earlier this month that she though her Sex And The City character Miranda had always been queer, even before she came out on And Just Like That; seen May 24 in NYC

‘Even though she was only really interested in men, I think that Miranda had many other queer and frankly, lesbianic qualities about her,’ she opined. ‘And I think for a lot of gay women, she — we didn’t have a gay woman! But she was a stand-in for the gay women we didn’t have.’

Michael Patrick King, the showrunner for both the original show and its continuation, asked Nixon if she wanted her character to be queer like her in the new show.

‘I was like, “Sure, why not!”‘ she recounted. ‘If we’re trying to do different stuff, and show different worlds, and show different aspects of these characters, why not do that?’

Hints: 'Even though she was only really interested in men, I think that Miranda had many other queer and frankly, lesbianic qualities about her,' she opined;  still from And Just Like That...

Hints: ‘Even though she was only really interested in men, I think that Miranda had many other queer and frankly, lesbianic qualities about her,’ she opined; still from And Just Like That…

Moving on: The new series sees her end her marriage to Steve (David Eigenberg) to date the nonbinary comedian Che Diaz (Sara Ramirez, who graced Variety's cover)

Moving on: The new series sees her end her marriage to Steve (David Eigenberg) to date the nonbinary comedian Che Diaz (Sara Ramirez, who graced Variety’s cover)

In order to give him space to develop the character, King decided he need to ‘get Miranda out of her marriage’ to Steve (David Eigenberg), though he initially envisioned her awakening coming via an affair with her professor after she went back to school .

Nixon, who didn’t mind showing Miranda’s life falling apart to a certain extent, vetoed her sleeping with a professor.

‘I know we’re crossing a lot of boundaries here that people have a lot of opinions about, but for me a boundary that I don’t want to see Miranda cross is dating her professor, you know? That’s not OK with me,’ she said.

Although moving on with Che (played by nonbinary actor Sara Ramirez) and the reveal of her true sexual orientation came as a shock to some longtime viewers, King though it was perfectly in line with how Miranda came to be married in the first place, which he said was ‘against her will almost.’

‘Miranda was an anarchy character,’ he explained. ‘She was like, “Why do I have to wear a dress and go out and pretend guys are smarter than they are?”‘

Chaos agent: Showrunner Michael Patrick King said Miranda was always the 'anarchy character.'  He originally wanted her awakening to come from an affair with a professor, but Nixon vetoed that;  still from And Just Like That...

Chaos agent: Showrunner Michael Patrick King said Miranda was always the ‘anarchy character.’ He originally wanted her awakening to come from an affair with a professor, but Nixon vetoed that; still from And Just Like That…

Patterns: Nixon added that her character had always been at odds with 'power, and female power versus male power, and women getting the short end of the stick — and that's a big issue for women who are queer';  still from Sex And The City

Patterns: Nixon added that her character had always been at odds with ‘power, and female power versus male power, and women getting the short end of the stick — and that’s a big issue for women who are queer’; still from Sex And The City

Nixon added that her character had always been at odds with ‘power, and female power versus male power, and women getting the short end of the stick—and that’s a big issue for women who are queer.’

‘I think not having to be under a man’s thumb has always been one of the very appealing things that being with another woman has to offer.’

Nixon added that Samantha (Kim Cattrall) briefly dated a female painter (played by Sônia Braga), suggesting that Sex And The City was more tuned in to queer characters than its reputation might suggest.

.

Leave a Comment